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Commonwealth Sports Ministers Meeting

Commonwealth governments will convene on Gold Coast, Australia, on 3 April 2018 for the 9th Commonwealth Sports Ministers Meeting. The meeting is held every two years alongside the Commonwealth Games or Summer Olympic and Paralympic Games.

Under the theme, Strengthening policy coherence to maximise the benefits of investing in sport, Ministers will address the contribution sport can make to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with an emphasis on strengthening the value and integrity of sport through policy coherence. The meeting will also discuss ways to leverage sport investment as a contributor to the SDGs and human rights, as well as enhancing Commonwealth cooperation on a cohesive sport policy agenda.

8th Commonwealth Sports Ministers Meeting

7th Commonwealth Sports Ministers Meeting

6th Commonwealth Sports Ministers Meeting

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Group photo of Secretary-General Patricia Scotland and the Commonwealth Sports MinistersMinistership call for ways to recognise the value of sport

Ministers say the measurement and evaluation of the contribution of sport, and making it mainstream to national development and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) need to be strengthened. MORE

Secretary-General Patricia Scotland with Bridget McKenzie, Australian Minister for Sport

Benefits of sport need to be measured

Sport helps education, health, gender equality, breaks down barriers and ensures social and economic empowerment. MORE

 

Secretary-General Patricia Scotland meeting the Bangladesh Youth and Sports Minister Dr Biren Sikder Bangladesh pledges sport linked to SDGs

Commonwealth Secretary-General Patricia Scotland has met the Bangladesh Youth and Sports Minister Dr Biren Sikder on the margins of the 9th Commonwealth Sports Ministers Meeting at the Gold Coast in Australia. MORE

Secretary-General Patricia Scotland speaking at the Commonwealth Games Federation General Assembly

Uncompromising Commonwealth commitment to sport integrity and governance

Commonwealth Secretary-General Patricia Scotland has said effective partnerships between sport and government will help to realise sport as a 'tool for development'. MORE

Athletes from the Commonwealth Youth Games walking in a stadium and waving at the crowd

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Hot Topics

Sport is set to be a major talking point in the Commonwealth over the coming weeks. The Gold Coast 2018 Commonwealth Games and the 9th Commonwealth Sports Ministers Meeting (9CSMM), which both take place next month, will provide a highly visible platform for sport to showcase its significance in helping to enhance sustainable development, help build more cohesive communities and impact on human rights. Under the 9CSMM theme, Strengthening policy coherence to maximise the benefits of investing in sport, Sports Ministers will address the contribution sport can make to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), with an emphasis on strengthening the value and integrity of sport through policy coherence.

A series of expert blogs also highlight key issues and challenges related to these issues.

Commonwealth Youth Network making an impact in sport for development and peace
Established in 2013, the Commonwealth Youth Sports for Development and Peace Network brings together culturally diverse young people who are passionate and have the expertise in sport for development and peace. Commonwealth Youth Network making an impact in sport for development and peace

Why policy coherence in sport matters
Ebba Dohlman explains how the OECD developed a Framework and guidance to support countries in enhancing policy coherence for SDG implementation. OECD’s Framework can be a useful screening tool to foster synergies, address trade-offs and avoid unintended consequences. Sport is no exception. Why policy coherence in sport matters

Policy coherence in small states
Mark Cutajar, sports adviser to the Government of Malta looks at why implementing a cohesive policy within small States might be less complicated and more straightforward than implementation in larger States. Policy coherence in small states

Sport for all: Count us in
Selina Khoo from the University of Malaya discusses how Sport for All is for everyone, no matter the ability or disability. It is inclusive, not exclusive. There are many advantages to participation in sport, and it has come to play an important role in modern society. Sport for all: Count us in

Gender mainstreaming in sport policy
Botswana is using sport to promote gender equality through the production of national guidelines and implementing a strategy for gender mainstreaming in sport, and playing an important leadership role in women in sport as hosts of the 7th IWG World Conference On Women and Sport in  May 2018 in Gaborone, Botswana. Gender mainstreaming in sport policy

With gender equality an important target for the Sustainable Development Goals and a focus of the upcoming Commonwealth Sports Minister’s Meeting, Game Mothibi, the Secretary-General, of the International Working Group on Women and Sport, shares progress of Botswana’s progress with gender mainstreaming in sport.

3rd Commonwealth Debate on Sport and Sustainable Development  

‘Sport pays for itself in the Commonwealth’

Set against the backdrop of the Commonwealth Games on the Gold Coast, Australia and the 9th Commonwealth Sports Minister’s meeting, this year’s debate ‘Sport pays for itself in the Commonwealth’ will be staged at the ‘pop up’ Commonwealth House on the Gold Coast on Friday, 6 April 2018.

The debate is part of the Value of Sport event: Maximising Opportunities in the Commonwealth - a collaboration between the Queensland Government, City of Gold Coast, the Commonwealth Secretariat and the Australian Government’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade and Office of Sport, supported by Griffith University.

This year’s debate will discuss whether investment in sport pays for itself in the Commonwealth. Creating jobs, boosting economic links and improving social returns can come from investing in sport. Increasing trade and investment opportunities from hosting major sport events. Improving health and well-being from getting more people physically active through sport. Building stronger diplomatic relations and people to people connections from sporting links between countries. Getting communities together through inclusive sporting activity. The list goes on.

Are these returns enough to say that investment in sport pays for itself in the Commonwealth? Is sport a cost effective investment or are there better ways for governments and business to achieve these objectives? Is a return on investment from sport automatic, or are specific policies, strategies and programmes needed to maximise returns? Do all members of the community benefit from current approaches to investing in sport, or are changes required to protect and promote the rights of all in sport?

The debate is held on the International Day of Sport for Development and Peace (proclaimed by the United Nations General Assembly in 2013) on 6 April. The day recognises the contribution of sport and physical activity to education, human development, healthy lifestyles and to building peaceful and inclusive communities. The day is helping to amplify advocacy efforts and recognition of the contribution sport can make to the global sustainable development goals and progress to achieve these important targets. 

Outlining how sport pays for itself will be:

  • Sen the Hon. Fortuna Belrose, Minister of Local Government and Culture, St Lucia and Regional Vice-President (Caribbean) of the Commonwealth Games Federation
  • Matelita Vuakoso, Community leader in the ‘Just Play’ programme of the Oceania Football Confederation and member of the Fijian National Football Team
  • Fabrizio Carmignani, Dean, Griffith University Business School

Presenting the case that sport can do more to maximise returns on investment will be:

  • Dame Katherine Grainger, Chair, UK Sports
  • Shantelle Thompson, two-time ju-jitsu world champion
  • Game Mothibi, Secretary-General, International Working Group on Women and Sport, Botswana

For more information about the debate, visit the Value of Sport portal