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Implementing Sierra Leone's Public Service Pay Strategy

The Government of Sierra Leone requested technical assistance for the reform of public pay as part of the preliminary work for the establishment of a Wage Commission.

Country: Sierra Leone
Host: The Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL)
Start date: 15/09/2014
End date: Improved public administration
Policy area: Governance & Natural Resources
Policy expert: Omar Mowlana
Project manager: Oluwatoyin Job

Background

The Government of Sierra Leone (GoSL) recognizes the pace, effectiveness and efficiency with which its developmental priorities, articulated in its Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper III, can be implemented depends on the quality of its public servants.

In 2011 a Cabinet Conclusion approved a multi-year pay reform strategy to make the compensation of public servants more competitive.

Goal

To provide technical support for the development of (i) a legal and policy framework on wages, salaries and compensation for cabinet approval and (ii) an operational framework for the implementation of the harmonised pay and grading structure in Sierra Leone's public service.

Specific areas of technical assistance to GoSL will include:

  • Advice on a fit for purpose structure for the administration of wages, salaries and compensation base on the context of Sierra Leone;
  • Benchmarked wages and salaries across the civil service and wider public service including selected public sector agencies;
  • Recommendations on the research capability required to support the management and administration of the pay and compensation system;
  • Recommendations on the operational framework for the implementation of the harmonised pay and grading structure in the public service agreed and validated by stakeholders;
  • Finalised operational framework for the implementation of the harmonised pay and grading structure in the public service. 
Impact

Public servants will benefit from a more robust, competitive public pay system.